The Most Overrrated (and Underrated) Beef Cuts List

From the Thrillist, their list of the most overrated and underrated beef cuts from the chefs and owners themselves of 14 different establishments around the country. Not surprisingly, it was almost unanimous for tenderloin to be overrated. Comments for reasons the tenderloin was overrated ranged from ‘lack of depth of flavor,’ ‘no fat,’ ‘boring,’ and ‘can be mushy.’ Here are other beef choices that are often overlooked: Beef Neck Ok, not my first choice here, but cooking it low and slow will result in a very tender cut. Taste of Divine has a great recipe for Braised Beef Neck Roast if you land yourself some beef neck. Flat Iron A very underrated cut, and a quick-cooking full-of-flavor steak. A flat iron steak comes from the chuck primal and has a good portion of marbling throughout. Tri Tip If you haven’t cooked this yet, I’m not sure what to say, but you are definitely missing out. It is probably the favorite cut for barbecue for everyone here at the house, and it needs just a simple rub before grilling. It has a unique triangular shape to it, and at least in SoCal, it is one of the most popular cuts found in the meat section during the height of grilling season. Bavette Bavette or flank steak. This cut takes all types of marinades very well. The grain is very apparent, but as long as you cut across the grain, it is a very tender piece of beef. Hanger Steak The hanger steak acts like a flank steak, and it comes from the plate primal. The hanger steak actually comes from...

Beef Chuck Cuts: Chuck Steak, Chuck Roast, Denver Steak, Short Ribs, and More

What is the Chuck Cut? The chuck comes from the front top of the beef forequarter which consists of chuck/shoulder, rib, plate, and shoulder/shank. The chuck portion is comparable to the shoulder in lamb, veal, and pork. Beef chuck comes in boneless or bone-in. Chuck that is ground up is less lean than other cuts of beef, such as ground round (which is a leaner cut in general). The Chuck Cuts of Beef 7-Bone Roast / 7-Bone Steak Other names: center cut pot roast, pot roast, seven bone roast. The 7-Bone cut is lean, making it a great braising cut. This cut includes a cross cut of the shoulder blade giving it a shape like the number 7. Steaks and roasts are the same cut, but the steaks are cut thinner, 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick. Blade Chuck Roast  The blade chuck roast is a lean cut, ideal for braising. Chuck Eye Roast Other names for this cut: chuck arm pot roast boneless, shoulder pot roast, inside chuck roll, boneless chuck fillet, mock tender steaks. The boneless chuck eye roast is the cut from the center of the roll, is a lean cut, and is good for roasting and for braising. As it is a lean cut so treat it appropriately. IMPS# 116D. Country Style Ribs Other names for this cut: boneless country style ribs, chuck ribs. This cut comes from the chuck eye roll, and is boneless. Country style ribs are great for grilling after moist heat, braising, or slow-cooked. These take to marinades well. IMPS# 1116D. Denver Steak Other names for this cut: under blade center cut...

7 Myths of Cooking Steak

  Here are seven popular old wives’ tales regarding cooking steaks that Serious Eats put to the test. Read the full article for their cooking results for each myth. A thick steak should be rested to room temperature before cooking. Answer? False. The theory is that a steak is best cooked when the temperature is close to the finished temp – as it cooks more evenly. The result was that after cooking two steaks side by side (one rested, other one cold) both steaks had the same evenness of cooking, and they seared at the same rate. Searing meat will lock in juices. Searing will not lock in juices. Actually, it is best when grilling to to start out on the cooler side of the grill, and then finish on the hotter side for best crust formation, and a juicier end product. Bone-in is better than boneless, because the bone will leach out flavor as the steak cooks. No exchange of flavor was found after grilling a bone-in steak when compared to the same cut that was boneless. But, the meat around the bone will cook at a different rate than the other parts (much slower and lower) and therefore will be more juicy than the rest of the cut. Only flip your steak once. Wrong. Flipping it multiple times will cook it faster, and will help with curling problems when the fat and connective tissues cook at a faster rate than the rest of the meat. But, the best grill marks are those when the steak has been on the grill long enough to get the char marks,...
5 Lean Cuts of Beef to Grill Now

5 Lean Cuts of Beef to Grill Now

You can still grill beef, and watch your diet. There are many different options when it comes to lean beef cuts. What is considered lean beef? A cut of beef that contains less than 10 grams of total fat and 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat. All the cuts of beef below contain less than 9 grams of total fat. When you compare each of them to a skinless chicken thigh, which has 9.2 grams of total fat, the 10 cuts below just opened up a whole new world of healthy beef grilling and eating. Flank Steak An all-around favorite, flank steak is easily transformed to whatever ethnic menu you are planning -simply on the marinade. Try ginger, soy sauce and a little honey for Asian-style; lime, jalapeno and corn oil for Mexican fajitas; and red wine vinegar, olive oil and fresh herbs for Italian-style. Flank steak contains 2.6 grams of saturated fat and 6.3 grams of total fat per 3-ounce serving. Beef Tenderloin Beef tenderloin is arguably one of the most versatile cuts due to its mouth-watering tenderness without a whole lot of prep.  Beef tenderloin is often grilled whole, and simply rubbed with a dried herb and spice crust. There is no connective tissue you’ll need to worry about, and the optimum cooking stage is no more than medium. Cooking it for longer, such as medium-well, tends to dry out this cut of meat. Beef tenderloin contains 2.7 grams of saturated fat and 7.1 grams of total fat per 3-ounce serving. Skirt Steak The skirt steak is often confused with the flank steak with its similar...
Beef Cut Name Glossary

Beef Cut Name Glossary

Here is a list of popular retail beef cuts. Read on to learn what primal cut they are associated with, and the  best cooking methods. Blade Roast – From the chuck section. Contains varying amounts of blade bone/back bone/rib bone with meat. Blade Steak – Same as Blade Roast, only thinner. Great for marinating. Bottom Round Roast (Steak) – From the round. Lean, and not as tender as other cuts. Becomes Cube Steak when tenderized, and Breakfast Steak when sliced thin. Breakfast Steak – See Bottom Round Roast. Brisket – Less tender; ideal for braising. The attached fat cap aids in keeping meat moist during long cooking times on the BBQ. Chateaubriand – From the tenderloin. Thick steak cut from the butt (thick) end of tenderloin. Cube Steak – Bottom round steaks that have been passed through a tenderizing machine. Coulotte Steak – Irregular cut/size of steak from the small end of top sirloin. Eye of Round – From the round. Solid muscle; ideal for pan frying, grilling, or braising, depending on thickness. For roasts: moist heat cooking. Filet Mignon – From the tenderloin. Filet Mignon roasts are the larger, boneless, 2 to 3 pound sized portions, and the steaks generally come from the center sections of the tenderloin beef muscle. Flank Steak – From the flank. Boneless piece of meat with long, thick fibers. Also known as London Broil. Always cut this piece across the grain. Flat Iron – From the chuck. Tender steaks. Pan fry, grill, or broil. Knitted Cube Steak – When multiple pieces of thin, boneless beef are ran through a tenderizer to make a single Cube Steak....

Variety Meats: Basic Definitions to Common and Uncommon Names

NameDescription AmouretteSpinal marrow. AnimellesTesticles. Bath ChapsSmoked pigs cheeks. Caul FatMembrane from pig intestine with a net-like look. ChapCheek or lower jaw. ChitterlingsPork - large intestines. CockscombFleshy part of the tops of certain birds. CrowMembrane holding intestines together. FriesTesticles. Foie GrasEnlarged goose liver. GibletsPoultry innards. GizzardsPoultry stomachs. Hog's MawPig's stomach. KernelsGland in veal shoulder covered in fat. LightsLungs. MarrowAnimal bone centers. MeltSpleen. MiltzKosher beef spleen. OreillesEars (French). OxNot actual ox animal; the lesser choice parts of beef. OxtailsBeef tails. Prairie OystersBeef testicles. Rocky Mountain OystersBeef testicles. Sow's MawPig's stomach. SweetbreadsCalf or lamb thymus gland. Tripe (Beef)Stomach of cow. Tripe - BlanketFirst part of a cow's stomach, smooth appearance. Tripe - Honeycomb TripeSecond part of a cow's stomach, honeycomb appearance. TrottersFeet. VessieAnimal's bladder. Images courtesy USDA. Renee Shelton’s love for tri tip almost surpasses her love for cake. When she’s not tasting BBQ, she can be found at Pastry Sampler.   All Q’d Up BBQ Blog Writers Dedicated to the art of grilling, smoking, and...