Whole Hog Cooking Guide

Whole Hog Cooking Guide

What to feed a crowd by cooking a whole pig and don’t know where to start? Begin with this guide, courtesy of the North Carolina Pork Council. Select Your Menu What do you plan on serving? Here are some recipes to get your started. All recipes feed a crowd. Carolina Eastern-Style Slaw Piedmon-Style Slaw (Red Slaw) Brunswick Stew Potato Salad Hush Puppies And for the sauces: Basic Eastern Carolina Hot Vinegar Barbecue Sauce Piedmont Lexington-Style Sauce Eastern Carolina Pig Pickin’ Sauce Western Carolina Ketchup-Based Barbecue Sauce Select Method of Preparation For whole hog or shoulders, etc. using wood, charcoal, or gas. Cooking Time For Whole Pig Barbecue Weight of PigCharcoalAmount of GasWoodCooker TemperatureApprox. Cooking Time75 lbs.60 lbs.40 lbs.1/3 cord225-250 degrees6 - 7 hours100 lbs.70 lbs.Cylinder1/3 - 1/2 cord225 - 250 degrees7 - 8 hours125 lbs.80 lbs.1/2 cord225 - 250 degrees8 - 9 hours/* Here you can add custom CSS for the current table */ /* Lean more about CSS: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascading_Style_Sheets */ /* To prevent the use of styles to other tables use "#supsystic-table-5" as a base selector for example: #supsystic-table-5 { ... } #supsystic-table-5 tbody { ... } #supsystic-table-5 tbody tr { ... } */ Important – Do not exceed 225 degrees F. cooking temperature for the first 2 hours of cooking. If using an “open” grill allow 1 hour per 10 pounds of pork. In order to achieve maximum tenderness an internal temperature of 180 degrees F. or above must be reached. If using gas cooker, read manufacturer’s instructions. When using charcoal or wood distribute more coals under the hams or shoulders and less in the center for...

Story of Sam Jones, 7th Generation Whole Hog Pitmaster at the Skylight Inn

A story of Sam Jomes, 7th generation whole hog pitmaster. The Skylight Inn has been in business since 1947 but his family has been making and selling whole hog BBQ since the 1830s. Renee Shelton Renee’s love for tri tip almost surpasses her love for cake. Almost. Really, it’s a tough call here. When she’s not tasting BBQ and dipping in the sauce, Renee can be found at...

Grill Skills: Professional Tips for the Perfect Barbeque

Blurb: In Grill Skills, professionals generously offer their very best tips, advice, and recipes. This is the book where Tex-Mex meets the islands, the Mediterranean meets Sweden, and the tropics meet urban balconies—an indispensable grill book for all tastes. Grill Skills is a multi author book. Mia Gahne explains how to whip up the perfect barbeque sauce. Tove Nilsson shares slightly tweaked traditional barbeque dinners with all the proper sides. Liselotte Forslin creates glorious barbeque buffets for all ages and tastes. Mia Öhrn conjures up the magic of grilled desserts. Bengt-Göran Kronstam gives expert advice on wines to go with your grilled meals. Catharina Lindenberg-Bernhardsson creates ambiance by imaginatively decorating around the grill. All this is accompanied by music selected by Jan Gradvall.   Book Overview and Chapters The book is separated by theme: 30 Commandments for a Grill Master; Grill for Dinner; Classic Bistro Grill; Family Grill Fest; Mediterranean Grill; BBQ Swedish Style; Setup for a Grill Party; Grilled Desserts; and Sure-Fire Wines. The 30 Commandments chapter has info on prepping for grilling, choosing a grill, and things to do during grilling and when it’s almost done. Recipes range from simple glazes to salads to desserts. Colorful pictures are throughout. Below is a recipe from the book, Jerk Chicken. Jerk Chicken 2016-07-27 18:00:26 Jerk is a spice mix from Jamaica with the sweet, intense taste of allspice, cinnamon, and nutmeg. The chicken becomes almost black when grilled due to the caramelization of the dark muscovado sugar together with all the spices. The chicken is butterflied so it can be grilled more quickly. Write a review Save Recipe Print...

The Most Overrrated (and Underrated) Beef Cuts List

From the Thrillist, their list of the most overrated and underrated beef cuts from the chefs and owners themselves of 14 different establishments around the country. Not surprisingly, it was almost unanimous for tenderloin to be overrated. Comments for reasons the tenderloin was overrated ranged from ‘lack of depth of flavor,’ ‘no fat,’ ‘boring,’ and ‘can be mushy.’ Here are other beef choices that are often overlooked: Beef Neck Ok, not my first choice here, but cooking it low and slow will result in a very tender cut. Taste of Divine has a great recipe for Braised Beef Neck Roast if you land yourself some beef neck. Flat Iron A very underrated cut, and a quick-cooking full-of-flavor steak. A flat iron steak comes from the chuck primal and has a good portion of marbling throughout. Tri Tip If you haven’t cooked this yet, I’m not sure what to say, but you are definitely missing out. It is probably the favorite cut for barbecue for everyone here at the house, and it needs just a simple rub before grilling. It has a unique triangular shape to it, and at least in SoCal, it is one of the most popular cuts found in the meat section during the height of grilling season. Bavette Bavette or flank steak. This cut takes all types of marinades very well. The grain is very apparent, but as long as you cut across the grain, it is a very tender piece of beef. Hanger Steak The hanger steak acts like a flank steak, and it comes from the plate primal. The hanger steak actually comes from...

Beef Chuck Cuts: Chuck Steak, Chuck Roast, Denver Steak, Short Ribs, and More

What is the Chuck Cut? The chuck comes from the front top of the beef forequarter which consists of chuck/shoulder, rib, plate, and shoulder/shank. The chuck portion is comparable to the shoulder in lamb, veal, and pork. Beef chuck comes in boneless or bone-in. Chuck that is ground up is less lean than other cuts of beef, such as ground round (which is a leaner cut in general). The Chuck Cuts of Beef 7-Bone Roast / 7-Bone Steak Other names: center cut pot roast, pot roast, seven bone roast. The 7-Bone cut is lean, making it a great braising cut. This cut includes a cross cut of the shoulder blade giving it a shape like the number 7. Steaks and roasts are the same cut, but the steaks are cut thinner, 1/2 to 3/4 inch thick. Blade Chuck Roast  The blade chuck roast is a lean cut, ideal for braising. Chuck Eye Roast Other names for this cut: chuck arm pot roast boneless, shoulder pot roast, inside chuck roll, boneless chuck fillet, mock tender steaks. The boneless chuck eye roast is the cut from the center of the roll, is a lean cut, and is good for roasting and for braising. As it is a lean cut so treat it appropriately. IMPS# 116D. Country Style Ribs Other names for this cut: boneless country style ribs, chuck ribs. This cut comes from the chuck eye roll, and is boneless. Country style ribs are great for grilling after moist heat, braising, or slow-cooked. These take to marinades well. IMPS# 1116D. Denver Steak Other names for this cut: under blade center cut...