Tri Tip with Deep Fried Brussels Sprouts

Tri Tip with Deep Fried Brussels Sprouts

  Ok. There is nothing better than deep fried Brussels sprouts, other than serving them with a good tri trip. Their natural sweet flavor seems to be brought out more when they are deep fried. They require no other prep other than to cut them in half (or keep them whole if you want). By the time the outside is browned, the inside is crisp-tender. While your next main course is on the bbq, try fixing these in the deep fryer to go along with it. Deep Fried Brussels Sprouts 2015-06-09 23:11:44 Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients Brussels sprouts, halved Oil, for frying Sea salt and fresh ground pepper, to season after frying Instructions Heat your oil to 375 degrees F. Add in your Brussels sprouts in batches, and remember not to overcrowd them in the oil. Deep fry until they are toasty brown on the outside. Remove with a slotted spoon to paper towels for draining, and repeat until you are done. Season with salt and pepper, and serve. Notes Fried brussels sprouts on their own are equally nice served with some freshly made garlic aioli. All Qd Up http://www.allqdup.com/ BBQ photos and All Q’d Up concept by Executive Chef John Shelton. His specialties include his original (and seriously good) Smoked Oysters in Cottonseed Oil. You’ll find him sharing his fishing adventures at Dana Point Fish Company. His portfolio is found at John Shelton Designs. Content by Renee Shelton. Her love for tri tip almost surpasses her love for cake. Almost. Really, it’s a tough call here. When she’s not tasting BBQ and dipping in the sauce, she can be found...
5 Lean Cuts of Beef to Grill Now

5 Lean Cuts of Beef to Grill Now

You can still grill beef, and watch your diet. There are many different options when it comes to lean beef cuts. What is considered lean beef? A cut of beef that contains less than 10 grams of total fat and 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat. All the cuts of beef below contain less than 9 grams of total fat. When you compare each of them to a skinless chicken thigh, which has 9.2 grams of total fat, the 10 cuts below just opened up a whole new world of healthy beef grilling and eating. Flank Steak An all-around favorite, flank steak is easily transformed to whatever ethnic menu you are planning -simply on the marinade. Try ginger, soy sauce and a little honey for Asian-style; lime, jalapeno and corn oil for Mexican fajitas; and red wine vinegar, olive oil and fresh herbs for Italian-style. Flank steak contains 2.6 grams of saturated fat and 6.3 grams of total fat per 3-ounce serving. Beef Tenderloin Beef tenderloin is arguably one of the most versatile cuts due to its mouth-watering tenderness without a whole lot of prep.  Beef tenderloin is often grilled whole, and simply rubbed with a dried herb and spice crust. There is no connective tissue you’ll need to worry about, and the optimum cooking stage is no more than medium. Cooking it for longer, such as medium-well, tends to dry out this cut of meat. Beef tenderloin contains 2.7 grams of saturated fat and 7.1 grams of total fat per 3-ounce serving. Skirt Steak The skirt steak is often confused with the flank steak with its similar...

Santa Maria Style Barbecue

Santa Maria-style barbecue is about as California as barbecue can get, making it a uniquely California regional BBQ style. Its pure barbecue taste shines through with the relatively short list of things needed, all having some tie to the Santa Maria Valley: tri tip, red oak wood, and pinquito beans. The history of Santa Maria-style barbecue dates back to the 1800s when ranchers would feed their vaqueros at the end of a long cattle drive every spring. To prevent bastardization of the ‘true’ Santa Maria BBQ, the Santa Maria Valley Chamber of Commerce copyrighted the basic recipe and menu concept, which is an important community tourist draw to the area. Menu and California Indigenous Ingredients A Santa Maria Style BBQ isn’t the same without these key elements: the basic rub (salt, pepper, and garlic salt), sirloin beef (tri tip for home bbq), Santa Maria Valley red oak wood, and  of course, pinquito beans. Three of the elements are indigenous to California, specifically the Santa Maria Valley region. The history of the tri tip goes like this: a butcher in the Santa Maria Valley decided to cook up a cut of meat previously used for ground beef, and gave it the name ‘tri tip’ due to its triangular shape. It is lean, but cooks up tender on the grill. While it took awhile for word to spread, tri tip now has a IMPS/NAMP classification. The red oak wood that is used in this style of barbecue is actually the Coast Live Oak, Quercus agrifolia, native to the Western California region which ranges from Southern Oregon all the way to the Northern portion of Baja, California (the California Floristic Province). It is classified as a red...
Tri Tip: California Beef Cut

Tri Tip: California Beef Cut

  What is Tri Tip? Tri Tip is one of three cuts from the bottom sirloin subprimal cut. The other two are the ball tip and the boneless flap.  All are separated by a natural seam in the meat. The tri tip cut is a boneless and triangular-shaped cut of meat consisting of the tensor fasciae latae muscle. There are only two cuts of tri tip per animal. It is given a NAMP item number 185C or 185D, the difference being in the amount of fat on the beef: the 185D has nearly all of the surface fat and membranous tissue removed. The tri tip is also known as bottom sirloin or triangle roast.  This cut is an important part of traditional Santa Maria Style Barbecue. History of the Tri Tip: Uniquely Californian Beef Cut The tri tip wasn’t always as popular as it is today. Its history dates back to the 1950s when a butcher named Bob Shutz from Santa Maria, California, used the piece of meat on a rotisserie rather than using it up for ground beef or stew meat, as was the general use for it back then. It was called ‘tri tip’ due to the shape of the meat cut, and it eventually became a signature West Coast cut of beef. Tri Tip: Lean Cut of Beef Because of its odd shape, the ends are sometimes cut off, against the grain, to square up the roast. The cut the ends may be cut into strips or cubes for simmered dishes or stews. The tri tip whole roast can also be cut into steaks, but if they are to be grilled, it is best to cut them at least an...