Whole Hog Cooking Guide

Whole Hog Cooking Guide

What to feed a crowd by cooking a whole pig and don’t know where to start? Begin with this guide, courtesy of the North Carolina Pork Council. Select Your Menu What do you plan on serving? Here are some recipes to get your started. All recipes feed a crowd. Carolina Eastern-Style Slaw Piedmon-Style Slaw (Red Slaw) Brunswick Stew Potato Salad Hush Puppies And for the sauces: Basic Eastern Carolina Hot Vinegar Barbecue Sauce Piedmont Lexington-Style Sauce Eastern Carolina Pig Pickin’ Sauce Western Carolina Ketchup-Based Barbecue Sauce Select Method of Preparation For whole hog or shoulders, etc. using wood, charcoal, or gas. Cooking Time For Whole Pig Barbecue Weight of PigCharcoalAmount of GasWoodCooker TemperatureApprox. Cooking Time75 lbs.60 lbs.40 lbs.1/3 cord225-250 degrees6 - 7 hours100 lbs.70 lbs.Cylinder1/3 - 1/2 cord225 - 250 degrees7 - 8 hours125 lbs.80 lbs.1/2 cord225 - 250 degrees8 - 9 hours/* Here you can add custom CSS for the current table */ /* Lean more about CSS: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cascading_Style_Sheets */ /* To prevent the use of styles to other tables use "#supsystic-table-5" as a base selector for example: #supsystic-table-5 { ... } #supsystic-table-5 tbody { ... } #supsystic-table-5 tbody tr { ... } */ Important – Do not exceed 225 degrees F. cooking temperature for the first 2 hours of cooking. If using an “open” grill allow 1 hour per 10 pounds of pork. In order to achieve maximum tenderness an internal temperature of 180 degrees F. or above must be reached. If using gas cooker, read manufacturer’s instructions. When using charcoal or wood distribute more coals under the hams or shoulders and less in the center for...

Story of Sam Jones, 7th Generation Whole Hog Pitmaster at the Skylight Inn

A story of Sam Jomes, 7th generation whole hog pitmaster. The Skylight Inn has been in business since 1947 but his family has been making and selling whole hog BBQ since the 1830s. Renee Shelton Renee’s love for tri tip almost surpasses her love for cake. Almost. Really, it’s a tough call here. When she’s not tasting BBQ and dipping in the sauce, Renee can be found at...

Bacon Glossary

Below are definitions related to bacon, including bacon made from meat other than pork. BACON: General Definition The term bacon is used to describe the cured pork belly, from the ‘belly’ or ‘side’ primal cut of pork. In other parts of the world, bacon may come from different cuts. If meat from other portions of the carcass is used, the product name must be qualified to identify the portions, e.g., Pork Shoulder Bacon. “Certified” refers to products that have been treated for trichinae, the roundworm that causes trichinosis. Although bacon is made famous from pork meat, bacon may also from other animal meat: beef, goat, etc. ARKANSAS AND ARKANSAS STYLE BACON Product which is identified as Arkansas Bacon or Arkansas Style Bacon is produced from the pork shoulder blade Boston roast.  The pork shoulder blade Boston roast includes the porcine muscle, fat and bone, cut interior of the second or third thoracic vertebrae, and posterior of the atlas joint (first cervical vertebrae), and dorsal of the center of the humerus bone. Arkansas Bacon – the neck bones and rib bones are removed by cutting close to the underside of those bones. The blade bone (scapula) and the dorsal fat covering, including the skin (clear plate), are removed, leaving no more than one-quarter inch of the fat covering the roast.  The meat is then dry cured with salt, sugar, nitrites, and spices, and smoked with natural smoke. The meat may not be injected or soaked in curing brine, nor may any artificial or liquid smoke be applied to the meat. Product that is prepared outside the state of Arkansas but in the manner...

Pork Dictionary

The pig is famous for being able to be used “nose to tail.” Here is a glossary related to all manner of pork products. AMMERLANDER SCHINKEN A dry-cured, typically smoked ham from Ammerland, North Germany. ANDOUILLE SAUSAGE Made with pork and/or pork byproducts stuffed into large intestines.  Associated with Cajun cooking. Product can be sold cooked or uncooked.  Andouille is a coined name and must be accompanied by a true product name, e.g., sausage  or “pudding” depending on formulation.  If beef is used, it must be shown in the product name, e.g., Beef Andouille Sausage. BACON For Bacon and Pork Sausage, Arkansas or Arkansas-Style Bacon, Canned Bacon, and Beef and Pork Bacon, see Bacon Glossary. The term bacon is used to describe the cured belly of a swine carcass. If meat from other portions of the carcass is used, the product name must be qualified to identify the portions, e.g., Pork Shoulder Bacon. “Certified” refers to products that have been treated for trichinae. BERLINER A cooked smoked sausage usually made from coarsely cut cured pork in large casings. When beef is used, it shall not exceed 50 per cent of the meat block.  Pork stomachs or beef tripe not permitted. BERLINER BLOOD SAUSAGE A cooked blood sausage containing diced bacon.  After cooking it is dried and smoked. Ham fat, snouts, and lips are not permitted. BIER SCHINKEN (German) The literal translation is “Beer Ham.”  If product is made of all pork, it may be labeled Bier Schinken. BLOOD PUDDING See Blood Sausage BLOOD  SAUSAGE A cooked sausage formulated with blood and some meat.  Usually contains pork skins and/or pork...

Ham Dictionary

Below are definitions related to ham. BIER SCHINKEN The literal translation is “Beer Ham.” German. If product is made of all pork, it may be labeled Bier Schinken. CANNED HAM “Canned meat with Natural Juices” is acceptable for product that has been pumped or contains up to 10% of a solution before canning and processing. Processed, canned, uncured meat products (when water or broth is added to the can) may not be called “with natural juices.” The acceptable name would be “with juices. Canned hams come in two forms: Shelf stable – Can be stored on the shelf up to 2 years at room temperature. Generally not over 3 pounds in size. Processed to kill all spoilage bacteria and pathogenic organisms such as Clostridium botulinum, Salmonella and Trichinella spiralis. The product is free of microorganisms capable of growing at ordinary room temperature. However, high temperature storage — above 122 °F (50 °C) — may result in harmless thermophylic bacteria multiplying and swelling or souring the product. Refrigerated – May be stored in the refrigerator for up to 6 to 9 months. Its weight can be up to 8% more than original uncured weight due to the uptake of water during curing. It need not be labeled “Added water” except for “In Natural Juices.” Net Weight is the weight of the actual ham excluding the container. Processed at a cook time and temperature sufficient to kill infectious organisms (including trichinae); however, the ham is not sterilized so spoilage bacteria may grow eventually. CAPACOLLO, COOKED (Capicola, Capocolla, Capacola, Capicollo, Cappicola, Capacolo – Italian) This product does not meet the definition of ham because...