Barbecue Vs. Smoking Vs. Grilling

Both barbecuing and grilling cooking techniques cook meat over open heat, but barbecue involves low and slow cooking with the addition of actual wood smoke. Barbecuing is cooking meat with a definite smoky flavor that naturally penetrates the meat. Barbecuing Barbecue uses larger cuts of meat than grilling, and the heat is indirect. The low and slow heat and cooking times are necessary to make the finished product tender, flavorful, and juicy. These low temperatures range from 200 to 250 degrees F, and are maintained during the entire barbecuing time, often one hour per pound of raw meat. Smoke from wood or wood chips impart flavor into the meat as it is barbecuing. Smoking: Cold or Hot Smoke Smoking meat involves either cold smoking or hot smoking. Cold smoking doesn’t actually cook the meat but gives it a definite smoke flavor. Because this method doesn’t cook the food, temperatures for cold smoking are below 85 degrees F, the meat or seafood being smoked must be cooked or cured before smoking, or cooked after smoking bringing the temperature to 160 F before being served (over 165 degrees or higher for poultry). Hot smoking is a cooking method, where the meat is heated or cooked slowly while using smoke to flavor. Meat and seafood that are hot smoked are typically brined or cured before smoking. Brining helps to not only flavor the meat, but the acid in the brine acts as a natural tenderizer. A dedicated smoker is generally preferred since the cooking temperature is better controlled. Grilling Grilling involves faster cooking, at higher temperatures, and generally uses smaller cuts of...

The Little Smoker Book

Blurb: This introduction to home smoking provides beginner smokers with information and delicious recipes for grilling, barbecuing, and smoking. It will give people who have not worked with a smoker on their own the tools and know-how to embark on this popular cooking method. Learn the basics of various kinds of smokers – barrel, water or bullet, and ceramic – to determine the best one for you. Get tips for determining the right type of firing — with wood or charcoal, as well as for selecting your home smoking accessories. There is also guidelines for the maintenance of your smoker. With 44 color images and recipes for pastes and marinades, pulled pork, brisket, chicken wings, ribs, brined dragon drumsticks, and sumptuous peach and fruit cobbler, you will be enjoying the “low and slow” in no time at all. Want to smoke that cut of pork, but not sure where to begin? The Little Smoker Book teaches you step by step the process of smoking with a handy timetable for your very first ribs smoke. The book describes the differences between grilling, barbecuing, and actual smoking. And before you start the smoke, you’ll need a smoker. Offset or barrel smokers, water or bullet smokers, and ceramic smokers are all covered. Included is a helpful section for maintaining your barrel smoker. Fire and Flavor The Little Smoker Book goes into firing up your smoker by wood, charcoal, or briquettes, and tips are given for starting up the smoker with either one. If you are using briquettes or charcoal as a heat source, then you’ll need chips, chunks, or pellets for flavor....
Smoked Oysters in Cottonseed Oil

Smoked Oysters in Cottonseed Oil

Like smoked oysters? This is a classic and straight forward recipe for smoked oysters using cottonseed oil. Excellent served by themselves, or in a dish. For more about the oyster, visit Dana Point Fish Company’s oyster articles. Smoked Oysters in Cottonseed Oil 2015-03-28 18:21:37 Write a review Save Recipe Print Ingredients 20 each oysters on the half shell, with liquor 2 cups cottonseed oil, refrigerator cold (no substitutions) Salt to taste Instructions Season the oysters with a sprinkling of salt, and smoke them over mesquite wood embers (for heat) at 225 degrees, and raw hickory wood chips (for smoke), for about 20 minutes or until oysters are done. Immediately remove oysters from heat and shuck into cold cottonseed oil to stop the cooking process. Serve immediately. Keeps in refrigerator for up to 3 days. By John Shelton All Qd Up http://www.allqdup.com/ All Q’d Up BBQ Blog Writers Dedicated to the art of grilling, smoking, and...
Avocado Wood

Avocado Wood

Avocado wood produces a mild to medium smoke, depending on the tree (not variety of avocado). The flavor is suited for red meats, but poultry also works with this wood. Type of foods that go well with avocado wood: Beef – whole roasts Pork – whole roasts Poultry – whole birds Renee Shelton’s love for tri tip almost surpasses her love for cake. When she’s not tasting BBQ, she can be found at Pastry Sampler. Photo by Executive Chef John Shelton. You can find him sharing his fishing adventures at Dana Point Fish Company.   All Q’d Up BBQ Blog Writers Dedicated to the art of grilling, smoking, and...